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The Streamable Buscar

Survey Finds That 59 Percent of Viewers Won’t Pay More Than $20 for Streaming Services

Stephanie Sengwe

As the streaming wars rage on, most media companies are putting a large focus on ensuring they have great content in order to lure subscribers. However, it seems the quality of content on any given platform may not matter if the price isn’t right. According to a new study conducted by ad-tech company The Trade Desk and YouGov, 59 percent of Americans aren’t willing to pay more than $20 a month for streaming services, while 75 percent said they wouldn’t exceed $30, CNBC reports.

Though customers across the board have generally been annoyed with ads, the survey found that consumers are willing to bite the bullet if it means maintaining a lower price point. The survey found that 53 percent of viewers would be open to ads on every other episode of a show in exchange for a lower bill. The survey also found that 68 percent of people would watch ads relevant to them if it meant having to deal with less commercials overall.

The Trade Desk and YouGov’s results are consistent with those from a separate study conducted by KPMG last year. The company found that subscribers between the ages 18-24 and 25-60 cited price as the number one factor when it comes to selecting a streaming service.

KPMG’s survey found that about 70 percent of respondents ages 18-24 and nearly 80 percent of those 25-60 currently pay $10-$40 per month for streaming subscriptions. In both age groups, a majority of the people were willing to pay up to $20 more per month while others wouldn’t be willing to raise their their monthly spend at all.

The survey also found that 32 percent of the 18-24-year-olds would consider adding a new service to their existing subscriptions regardless of price, while 22 percent would add based on price. For 25-60-year-olds, 28 percent of respondents would consider adding a new service to their existing subscriptions regardless of price and 33 would base the decision on price. The numbers for people who wouldn’t consider a new service were close in both demographics, with 11 percent in the 18-24 group and 10 percent in the 25-60 group.